bloodanddye:

"And I thought the Victorians were the kings of gadgets" Emily giggled. "It’s kinda sad that most of that isn’t what survived into history books. Instead everyone focuses on war and religion and royalty. Not the neat things that made life more interesting. Not the stories and people and places that made up life."
Emily shrugged, bent her legs on the ground and pressed the soles of her feet together, before wrapping her fingers about them. “But now I have you to tell me stories” she grinned, rocking slightly to and fro. “It was— It was completely amazing to see things as you showed me, but… I’ve always loved stories. Proper stories, you know. My mum would read to me every single night when I was small. Either that or she would teach me the stories and songs that her mum taught her. I loved that. I miss that…”
Her smiled faltered for only a moment, but when she looked back to Adam it became bright and contented once more. “Would you tell me bedtime stories? Vincent and I. I’ll wear fuzzy bunny slippers and everything. I— I’d kinda love that. It would be another chance for me to, um…” Her voice fell to barely a whisper. “Another chance to be your little girl” she muttered, smiling as though she might just blush.

"I would love to hear some of your stories, Em."
Adam smiled softly to his daughter. When her smile faded he scooted closer to her and wrapped an arm around her shoulders to hold her.
"I like to hear stories too. From the traders of my childhood, on through the ages, it’s not something you ever out-grow."
He grinned and gave her a gentle hug. 
"Of course I’ll tell you proper bedtime stories. What kind do you like? Campfire, fairy, spooky, funny? I’ve got a good one about mayonnaise, but it’s utterly disgusting."

bloodanddye:

"And I thought the Victorians were the kings of gadgets" Emily giggled. "It’s kinda sad that most of that isn’t what survived into history books. Instead everyone focuses on war and religion and royalty. Not the neat things that made life more interesting. Not the stories and people and places that made up life."

Emily shrugged, bent her legs on the ground and pressed the soles of her feet together, before wrapping her fingers about them. “But now I have you to tell me stories” she grinned, rocking slightly to and fro. “It was— It was completely amazing to see things as you showed me, but… I’ve always loved stories. Proper stories, you know. My mum would read to me every single night when I was small. Either that or she would teach me the stories and songs that her mum taught her. I loved that. I miss that…”

Her smiled faltered for only a moment, but when she looked back to Adam it became bright and contented once more. “Would you tell me bedtime stories? Vincent and I. I’ll wear fuzzy bunny slippers and everything. I— I’d kinda love that. It would be another chance for me to, um…” Her voice fell to barely a whisper. “Another chance to be your little girl” she muttered, smiling as though she might just blush.

"I would love to hear some of your stories, Em."

Adam smiled softly to his daughter. When her smile faded he scooted closer to her and wrapped an arm around her shoulders to hold her.

"I like to hear stories too. From the traders of my childhood, on through the ages, it’s not something you ever out-grow."

He grinned and gave her a gentle hug. 

"Of course I’ll tell you proper bedtime stories. What kind do you like? Campfire, fairy, spooky, funny? I’ve got a good one about mayonnaise, but it’s utterly disgusting."


bloodanddye:

"You’re just ‘father’ to me" Emily grinned. "Dad’s dad and you’re father. Or should I say ‘ada’ now?" she asked with a laugh, although she was completely serious.
"I’ve seen new generations adapt and incorporate bits of the past into their culture. I guess beliefs are the same way. They sort of… Evolve. But I hate how everyone seems to think that only their beliefs are ‘right’. My mum… My mum had to hide her true faith, as well as her heritage. She was a Catholic girl from Ireland posing as a well-bred English nurse. She couldn’t even wear her cross, which she gave to me. It’s… Well, it’s silver so I have it hidden in my room… B-but, anyway - everyone in England thought Catholics were the cause of all problems then… It’s not just you. It’s all propaganda, one way or another…"
Emily gave him a soft smile. “I wish that I could have met your family. Your blood-family, that is. Do you think I would have gotten on with any of them?”

Adam grinned. “You could call me Old Fart and I wouldn’t mind.”
But as Emily went on he hugged her briefly. 
"See now that’s the kind of shit that makes me think that polytheism is better. Hatred over petty nitpicking when it’s the same damn religion. I’m so sorry you saw such things. Yeah, there was some our god is better than your god shit going on, but mostly it came out in who’s temple had the biggest statue or newest gadget.
"I remember the Temple to Aphrodite had a two statues in it. One was made from about a thousand or two load stones while the other was a really thin sheet of cast iron. During the appropriate ceremony the two statues were moved to sit on the same bench and if the Priestess timed it right, just as she was getting to the moral of the story, the two statues would appear to move towards each other in an embrace.
"Magnets. Made going to church exciting.
"Not to be out done, once the moving statues were installed, the temple across the street highered an engineer to install automatic doors using thermal dynamics and steam pressure from a symbolic bonfire. It was slow as fuck, but the doors opened on their own. Eventually they realized they should move the intake tube to above the fire instead of below it and that got the doors open a lot quicker.
"I messed with the Temple of Zeus once. I told the Priest of Apollo how to make a weak battery out of a grapefruit and some tar. Zeus turned around and got vending machines that dispensed a cup of ritually pure water to wash your hands and feet before you would enter. 
"Fucking actors guild beat everyone though. They had this machine that rolled out onto stage. All done with wound spools rope and cut outs, but it was a fully automatic shadow play with changing scenery and one scene that even had sound effects. Marbles dropped onto a little drum."

bloodanddye:

"You’re just ‘father’ to me" Emily grinned. "Dad’s dad and you’re father. Or should I say ‘ada’ now?" she asked with a laugh, although she was completely serious.

"I’ve seen new generations adapt and incorporate bits of the past into their culture. I guess beliefs are the same way. They sort of… Evolve. But I hate how everyone seems to think that only their beliefs are ‘right’. My mum… My mum had to hide her true faith, as well as her heritage. She was a Catholic girl from Ireland posing as a well-bred English nurse. She couldn’t even wear her cross, which she gave to me. It’s… Well, it’s silver so I have it hidden in my room… B-but, anyway - everyone in England thought Catholics were the cause of all problems then… It’s not just you. It’s all propaganda, one way or another…"

Emily gave him a soft smile. “I wish that I could have met your family. Your blood-family, that is. Do you think I would have gotten on with any of them?”

Adam grinned. “You could call me Old Fart and I wouldn’t mind.”

But as Emily went on he hugged her briefly. 

"See now that’s the kind of shit that makes me think that polytheism is better. Hatred over petty nitpicking when it’s the same damn religion. I’m so sorry you saw such things. Yeah, there was some our god is better than your god shit going on, but mostly it came out in who’s temple had the biggest statue or newest gadget.

"I remember the Temple to Aphrodite had a two statues in it. One was made from about a thousand or two load stones while the other was a really thin sheet of cast iron. During the appropriate ceremony the two statues were moved to sit on the same bench and if the Priestess timed it right, just as she was getting to the moral of the story, the two statues would appear to move towards each other in an embrace.

"Magnets. Made going to church exciting.

"Not to be out done, once the moving statues were installed, the temple across the street highered an engineer to install automatic doors using thermal dynamics and steam pressure from a symbolic bonfire. It was slow as fuck, but the doors opened on their own. Eventually they realized they should move the intake tube to above the fire instead of below it and that got the doors open a lot quicker.

"I messed with the Temple of Zeus once. I told the Priest of Apollo how to make a weak battery out of a grapefruit and some tar. Zeus turned around and got vending machines that dispensed a cup of ritually pure water to wash your hands and feet before you would enter. 

"Fucking actors guild beat everyone though. They had this machine that rolled out onto stage. All done with wound spools rope and cut outs, but it was a fully automatic shadow play with changing scenery and one scene that even had sound effects. Marbles dropped onto a little drum."


askhenrysturges:

vampireadam:

askhenrysturges:

Henry laughed softly with a warm smile. “Which one?”

"Hmm. Tonight. Us. All of it. Not just where we are, but who we are. Our family."

The younger vampire could only smile warmly, leaning happily into his love. “Yes… This point in life is quite perfect, isn’t it?” He hummed.

Adam could only smile and nuzzle closer to Henry. 


askhenrysturges:

Henry laughed softly with a warm smile. “Which one?”

"Hmm. Tonight. Us. All of it. Not just where we are, but who we are. Our family."


askhenrysturges:

vampireadam:

askhenrysturges:

vampireadam:

askhenrysturges:

Henry smiled warmly, playing with Adam’s hair lovingly as he closed his eyes.

Adam couldn’t help but hum as the sun faded from the sky.

Henry watched the sun, his eyes moving to the moon soon as the last of the sun disappeared behind mountains, leaving nothing but rays to slowly sink after it.

Adam sank into Henry’s arms, or rather leaned closer to Henry, sighing and with a loving smile.

Henry smiled warmly, wrapping his arms around him tightly and nuzzling him lovingly. “This was a brilliant idea…”

"Shhh. Don’t tell anyone, or you’ll ruin my reputation.’ he joked. ‘It was a good one. Thank you for inspiring it."


askhenrysturges:

vampireadam:

askhenrysturges:

Henry smiled warmly as he bit back a comment on how he knew what the other was saying, instead giving a nod. “I suppose that makes it *mucg* easier. Organizing the organizations?”

Adam smirked and kissed Henry’s cheek. “It’s silly, I know.”

"No, it isn’t." Henry assured. "I am just teasing for fun."

Adam laughed.

"I know Love. I’m an easy mark. I’m older than pants after all, but at least my boots didn’t have pointless buckles on them."


askhenrysturges:

vampireadam:

askhenrysturges:

Henry smiled warmly, playing with Adam’s hair lovingly as he closed his eyes.

Adam couldn’t help but hum as the sun faded from the sky.

Henry watched the sun, his eyes moving to the moon soon as the last of the sun disappeared behind mountains, leaving nothing but rays to slowly sink after it.

Adam sank into Henry’s arms, or rather leaned closer to Henry, sighing and with a loving smile.


bloodanddye:


Adam nodded.
"It helped that no one had seen anything like me before. Superstitions existed of course, but all the bad things lived in the mythical ‘out there’, out in the deserts. That’s why traders were seen as brave. But those traders also had a sort of sunblock. It was made out of a dried and ground up tree bark and oils. I simply adapted it. It’s not that interesting, I know. As for how I learned I could make others….
Adam sighed.
"My sister worked as a spy. Before I moved to Ur, I got word that she had been captured. I don’t know how, or what happened to her, but I went to see if I could get her out. She was half mad by the time I got to the ‘others’ town. You were either a Sumer or you were other. I convinced the men holding her to let me see her. She attacked me and she bit me. She died soon after and they let me take her home. I still had to travel by night, so getting home was slow. She woke up on the way and she was like me. So we went back to the town and we slaughtered the soldiers. She was almost herself again after that at least more sane.
"Back in my time the Gods were not afraid to kick some ass. Istar herself marched into hell and threw open the gates, letting evil into the world. To offend the Gods was to risk their wrath. I wasn’t a prophet or a priest, I was just some jackoff Nana-Suen helped. Because it was the Moon God who stepped in, I could only exist at night. So I was no threat to the King, I was in fact cursed and something to be pitied. At least that is how the King’s men saw me. Why risk Nana-Suen’s wrath for a creature for whom all the day was forbidden.
"That is of course assuming it was the Gods. I don’t know, anymore. Over time I have seen so many pantheons come and go so… such horror committed in the name of religion, I have quite become something of an athiest. But I do respect people’s right to believe. Overt time is become quite the propaganda coup for me."

"I— I still believe in God…" Emily admitted in a hushed tone with a hint of shame. "I-I-I mean, I don’t think that we come from the Devil anymore. I don’t think I’m a demon… But I— I can’t help but hold onto those beliefs. I want to think that my mum is in heaven, and so is dad’s wife and unborn child and your wife and children and siblings. Even if I can’t ever be with her, I want to think that she’s somewhere better. And I want to think that there’s good in the world…"
"But telling you this, after what you showed me— I feel a bit foolish" she murmured. "You lived long before the bible even exist. You lived in a time when Christians were persecuted and fed to lions. It must all seem a bit stupid to you."
Emily looked at him with a force half-smile then sighed. “I wish I could have met your sister - your family. I guess you have a rather large family now, considering” she laughed. “But blood is something different…”
Again she looked to him, but this time her face held more cheer. Slowly, she snaked her arms around his neck and hugged him tightly. “Thank you for showing me all of that. It was— Amazing.”

"Oh Em, there is absolutely nothing wrong with that. It’s okay to believe, to hold on to the best of it. It’s not silly at all and it’s nothing to be ashamed of. There are moments where even I pray too. To whom depends on the situation, but I am not against stacking the deck.Adam kissed her temple. It really was fine with him."I can say no Christian was ever fed to the lions. That is an example of hyperbole at it’s best. What I take issue with is when people use their religion to hurt others. That is the only part of it I don’t like. But you did touch on something…."There is a lot of Sumerian in the Bible. There was even an Adam of the Sumer, and a great flood, plagues and demons and miracles.  We even had a sort of pseudo - Jesus in Gilgamesh. Even Eden. The word, in my language means the land between 4 rivers, it describes Sumer. After all the biblical era Jews lived in Babylon, there was a bit of cultural bleedover. The Jewish Founder Abraham, was born in Babylon. "My name Adam came about as a propaganda tool. It was the easiest way of telling people who I was. You know my actual name now, Mezizi."

bloodanddye:

Adam nodded.

"It helped that no one had seen anything like me before. Superstitions existed of course, but all the bad things lived in the mythical ‘out there’, out in the deserts. That’s why traders were seen as brave. But those traders also had a sort of sunblock. It was made out of a dried and ground up tree bark and oils. I simply adapted it. It’s not that interesting, I know. As for how I learned I could make others….

Adam sighed.

"My sister worked as a spy. Before I moved to Ur, I got word that she had been captured. I don’t know how, or what happened to her, but I went to see if I could get her out. She was half mad by the time I got to the ‘others’ town. You were either a Sumer or you were other. I convinced the men holding her to let me see her. She attacked me and she bit me. She died soon after and they let me take her home. I still had to travel by night, so getting home was slow. She woke up on the way and she was like me. So we went back to the town and we slaughtered the soldiers. She was almost herself again after that at least more sane.

"Back in my time the Gods were not afraid to kick some ass. Istar herself marched into hell and threw open the gates, letting evil into the world. To offend the Gods was to risk their wrath. I wasn’t a prophet or a priest, I was just some jackoff Nana-Suen helped. Because it was the Moon God who stepped in, I could only exist at night. So I was no threat to the King, I was in fact cursed and something to be pitied. At least that is how the King’s men saw me. Why risk Nana-Suen’s wrath for a creature for whom all the day was forbidden.

"That is of course assuming it was the Gods. I don’t know, anymore. Over time I have seen so many pantheons come and go so… such horror committed in the name of religion, I have quite become something of an athiest. But I do respect people’s right to believe. Overt time is become quite the propaganda coup for me."

"I— I still believe in God…" Emily admitted in a hushed tone with a hint of shame. "I-I-I mean, I don’t think that we come from the Devil anymore. I don’t think I’m a demon… But I— I can’t help but hold onto those beliefs. I want to think that my mum is in heaven, and so is dad’s wife and unborn child and your wife and children and siblings. Even if I can’t ever be with her, I want to think that she’s somewhere better. And I want to think that there’s good in the world…"

"But telling you this, after what you showed me— I feel a bit foolish" she murmured. "You lived long before the bible even exist. You lived in a time when Christians were persecuted and fed to lions. It must all seem a bit stupid to you."

Emily looked at him with a force half-smile then sighed. “I wish I could have met your sister - your family. I guess you have a rather large family now, considering” she laughed. “But blood is something different…”

Again she looked to him, but this time her face held more cheer. Slowly, she snaked her arms around his neck and hugged him tightly. “Thank you for showing me all of that. It was— Amazing.”

"Oh Em, there is absolutely nothing wrong with that. It’s okay to believe, to hold on to the best of it. It’s not silly at all and it’s nothing to be ashamed of. There are moments where even I pray too. To whom depends on the situation, but I am not against stacking the deck.

Adam kissed her temple. It really was fine with him.

"I can say no Christian was ever fed to the lions. That is an example of hyperbole at it’s best. What I take issue with is when people use their religion to hurt others. That is the only part of it I don’t like. But you did touch on something….

"There is a lot of Sumerian in the Bible. There was even an Adam of the Sumer, and a great flood, plagues and demons and miracles. We even had a sort of pseudo - Jesus in Gilgamesh. Even Eden. The word, in my language means the land between 4 rivers, it describes Sumer. After all the biblical era Jews lived in Babylon, there was a bit of cultural bleedover. The Jewish Founder Abraham, was born in Babylon.

"My name Adam came about as a propaganda tool. It was the easiest way of telling people who I was. You know my actual name now, Mezizi."


bloodanddye:


Adam chuckled. “Do you what Mana is? For a very long time and in certain parts of the world even today, they still eat Mana. You drain a bit of blood from a cow or a donkey, even lions and you stir it until it separates. The white cells are the part you eat, the rest you can drink. Being in a trading village, we were well use use to Mana. My village found out as I did, but it was all brand new. They weren’t afraid of me. 
"In time, as I figured things out, so did everyone else. After all the only way any of us understood it, was that I was reborn of Nana-Suen, and you don’t argue with the Gods. Besides, I was still me. After a while, I finally did get to go on my adventures. Once I had figured the basic things out a bit, I began going after thieves and raiders over the hill, bringing goods and pack animals back to the traders who had survived and make it to my village.
"But after a while yes, I did leave. Once my children had died of old age, I went to the city, where I worked as a teacher. There was one one time I went before that. You see… in my culture, only a King or a Prince was allowed to kill a lion. That’s why we had to send for the soldiers in the first place. Once the soldiers reported back I was summoned on suspicion of treason. But the Priests and Priestesses spoke up for me, and not even the King would question the Gods, so I was allowed to go home without too much trouble. My Boys and their families did enjoy their trip to the city though.
"In time I came to understand that while I could live on animal blood, it was never really enough. The few times I had gotten to kill the thieves were good.. real good. But even back then murder was frowned upon. In time I would have turned on the people of my home, so I left to the city where I could hide among the masses. And no, I didn’t tell them who I was. As far as anyone knew I was just a night school teacher. 
"It all fell apart of course, but that’s a story for another time."

"You were lucky that the gods were seen so differently in your time…" Emily whispered, once again staring at her hands as they rested in her lap. "In my time, anything even slightly strange or supernatural, or even just something someone didn’t like or agree with, was ‘from the Devil’. Even I thought that I was— But the way it all started, I sort of had a reason to." She shrugged slightly and looked up at him. 
"How did you figure out that you could make others like you? A-and what about the sun balm? I mean, if I’d known there was something out there to keep me from getting Kentucky fried before breakfast, I would have been on that like gum on a shoe" she said with a laugh. "They seem like kinda amazing things to discover."

Adam nodded. "It helped that no one had seen anything like me before. Superstitions existed of course, but all the bad things lived in the mythical ‘out there’, out in the deserts. That’s why traders were seen as brave. But those traders also had a sort of sunblock. It was made out of a dried and ground up tree bark and oils. I simply adapted it. It’s not that interesting, I know. As for how I learned I could make others…. Adam sighed."My sister worked as a spy. Before I moved to Ur, I got word that she had been captured. I don’t know how, or what happened to her,  but I went to see if I could get her out. She was half mad by the time I got to the ‘others’ town. You were either a Sumer or you were other. I convinced the men holding her to let me see her. She attacked me and she bit me. She died soon after and they let me take her home. I still had to travel by night, so getting home was slow. She woke up on the way and she was like me. So we went back to the town and we slaughtered the soldiers. She was almost herself again after that at least more sane."Back in my time the Gods were not afraid to kick some ass. Istar herself marched into hell and threw open the gates, letting evil into the world. To offend the Gods was to risk their wrath. I wasn’t a prophet or a priest, I was just some jackoff Nana-Suen helped. Because it was the Moon God who stepped in, I could only exist at night. So I was no threat to the King, I was in fact cursed and something to be pitied. At least that is how the King’s men saw me. Why risk Nana-Suen’s wrath for a creature for whom all the day was forbidden."That is of course assuming it was the Gods. I don’t know, anymore. Over time I have seen so many pantheons come and go so… such horror committed in the name of religion, I have quite become something of an athiest. But I do respect people’s right to believe. Overt time is become quite the propaganda coup for me."

bloodanddye:

Adam chuckled. “Do you what Mana is? For a very long time and in certain parts of the world even today, they still eat Mana. You drain a bit of blood from a cow or a donkey, even lions and you stir it until it separates. The white cells are the part you eat, the rest you can drink. Being in a trading village, we were well use use to Mana. My village found out as I did, but it was all brand new. They weren’t afraid of me. 

"In time, as I figured things out, so did everyone else. After all the only way any of us understood it, was that I was reborn of Nana-Suen, and you don’t argue with the Gods. Besides, I was still me. After a while, I finally did get to go on my adventures. Once I had figured the basic things out a bit, I began going after thieves and raiders over the hill, bringing goods and pack animals back to the traders who had survived and make it to my village.

"But after a while yes, I did leave. Once my children had died of old age, I went to the city, where I worked as a teacher. There was one one time I went before that. You see… in my culture, only a King or a Prince was allowed to kill a lion. That’s why we had to send for the soldiers in the first place. Once the soldiers reported back I was summoned on suspicion of treason. But the Priests and Priestesses spoke up for me, and not even the King would question the Gods, so I was allowed to go home without too much trouble. My Boys and their families did enjoy their trip to the city though.

"In time I came to understand that while I could live on animal blood, it was never really enough. The few times I had gotten to kill the thieves were good.. real good. But even back then murder was frowned upon. In time I would have turned on the people of my home, so I left to the city where I could hide among the masses. And no, I didn’t tell them who I was. As far as anyone knew I was just a night school teacher. 

"It all fell apart of course, but that’s a story for another time."

"You were lucky that the gods were seen so differently in your time…" Emily whispered, once again staring at her hands as they rested in her lap. "In my time, anything even slightly strange or supernatural, or even just something someone didn’t like or agree with, was ‘from the Devil’. Even I thought that I was— But the way it all started, I sort of had a reason to." She shrugged slightly and looked up at him. 

"How did you figure out that you could make others like you? A-and what about the sun balm? I mean, if I’d known there was something out there to keep me from getting Kentucky fried before breakfast, I would have been on that like gum on a shoe" she said with a laugh. "They seem like kinda amazing things to discover."

Adam nodded.

"It helped that no one had seen anything like me before. Superstitions existed of course, but all the bad things lived in the mythical ‘out there’, out in the deserts. That’s why traders were seen as brave. But those traders also had a sort of sunblock. It was made out of a dried and ground up tree bark and oils. I simply adapted it. It’s not that interesting, I know. As for how I learned I could make others….

Adam sighed.

"My sister worked as a spy. Before I moved to Ur, I got word that she had been captured. I don’t know how, or what happened to her, but I went to see if I could get her out. She was half mad by the time I got to the ‘others’ town. You were either a Sumer or you were other. I convinced the men holding her to let me see her. She attacked me and she bit me. She died soon after and they let me take her home. I still had to travel by night, so getting home was slow. She woke up on the way and she was like me. So we went back to the town and we slaughtered the soldiers. She was almost herself again after that at least more sane.

"Back in my time the Gods were not afraid to kick some ass. Istar herself marched into hell and threw open the gates, letting evil into the world. To offend the Gods was to risk their wrath. I wasn’t a prophet or a priest, I was just some jackoff Nana-Suen helped. Because it was the Moon God who stepped in, I could only exist at night. So I was no threat to the King, I was in fact cursed and something to be pitied. At least that is how the King’s men saw me. Why risk Nana-Suen’s wrath for a creature for whom all the day was forbidden.

"That is of course assuming it was the Gods. I don’t know, anymore. Over time I have seen so many pantheons come and go so… such horror committed in the name of religion, I have quite become something of an athiest. But I do respect people’s right to believe. Overt time is become quite the propaganda coup for me."


bloodanddye:

"I know what an auroch is" Emily said with a laugh, not trying to be smart, just simply stating facts. She really did know what an auroch was, even if she had only found out in the last few minutes.
"I never thought of you being scared…" she admitted, slowly leaning in to rest her head against his shoulder. "I never really thought of you being human either. I mean, I knew— I knew both you and dad were human once. You had lives and families and— And you died… But I never really thought about it."
Emily fidgeted slightly with the hem of her grey t-shirt, staring at her fingers. “It must have been so much worse…” she whispered. “I mean, by my time most people knew the sort of standard ‘rules’ about vampires. I still ended up being burned and I still ended up starving just because I didn’t want to believe things, but I did know. At least a bit…  And you— Oh God…”
Her warm brown eyes turned to his face, round and curious, yet childishly mournful. “What— What happened when they found out?” she asked hesitantly.

Adam chuckled. “Do you what Mana is? For a very long time and in certain parts of the world even today, they still eat Mana. You drain a bit of blood from a cow or a donkey, even lions and you stir it until it separates. The white cells are the part you eat, the rest you can drink. Being in a trading village, we were well use use to Mana. My village found out as I did, but it was all brand new. They weren’t afraid of me. 
"In time, as I figured things out, so did everyone else. After all the only way any of us understood it, was that I was reborn of Nana-Suen, and you don’t argue with the Gods. Besides, I was still me. After a while, I finally did get to go on my adventures. Once I had figured the basic things out a bit, I began going after thieves and raiders over the hill, bringing goods and pack animals back to the traders who had survived and make it to my village.
"But after a while yes, I did leave. Once my children had died of old age, I went to the city, where I worked as a teacher. There was one one time I went before that. You see… in my culture, only a King or a Prince was allowed to kill a lion. That’s why we had to send for the soldiers in the first place. Once the soldiers reported back I was summoned on suspicion of treason. But the Priests and Priestesses spoke up for me, and not even the King would question the Gods, so I was allowed to go home without too much trouble. My Boys and their families did enjoy their trip to the city though.
"In time I came to understand that while I could live on animal blood, it was never really enough. The few times I had gotten to kill the thieves were good.. real good. But even back then murder was frowned upon. In time I would have turned on the people of my home, so I left to the city where I could hide among the masses. And no, I didn’t tell them who I was. As far as anyone knew I was just a night school teacher. 
"It all fell apart of course, but that’s a story for another time."

bloodanddye:

"I know what an auroch is" Emily said with a laugh, not trying to be smart, just simply stating facts. She really did know what an auroch was, even if she had only found out in the last few minutes.

"I never thought of you being scared…" she admitted, slowly leaning in to rest her head against his shoulder. "I never really thought of you being human either. I mean, I knew— I knew both you and dad were human once. You had lives and families and— And you died… But I never really thought about it."

Emily fidgeted slightly with the hem of her grey t-shirt, staring at her fingers. “It must have been so much worse…” she whispered. “I mean, by my time most people knew the sort of standard ‘rules’ about vampires. I still ended up being burned and I still ended up starving just because I didn’t want to believe things, but I did know. At least a bit…  And you— Oh God…”

Her warm brown eyes turned to his face, round and curious, yet childishly mournful. “What— What happened when they found out?” she asked hesitantly.

Adam chuckled. “Do you what Mana is? For a very long time and in certain parts of the world even today, they still eat Mana. You drain a bit of blood from a cow or a donkey, even lions and you stir it until it separates. The white cells are the part you eat, the rest you can drink. Being in a trading village, we were well use use to Mana. My village found out as I did, but it was all brand new. They weren’t afraid of me. 

"In time, as I figured things out, so did everyone else. After all the only way any of us understood it, was that I was reborn of Nana-Suen, and you don’t argue with the Gods. Besides, I was still me. After a while, I finally did get to go on my adventures. Once I had figured the basic things out a bit, I began going after thieves and raiders over the hill, bringing goods and pack animals back to the traders who had survived and make it to my village.

"But after a while yes, I did leave. Once my children had died of old age, I went to the city, where I worked as a teacher. There was one one time I went before that. You see… in my culture, only a King or a Prince was allowed to kill a lion. That’s why we had to send for the soldiers in the first place. Once the soldiers reported back I was summoned on suspicion of treason. But the Priests and Priestesses spoke up for me, and not even the King would question the Gods, so I was allowed to go home without too much trouble. My Boys and their families did enjoy their trip to the city though.

"In time I came to understand that while I could live on animal blood, it was never really enough. The few times I had gotten to kill the thieves were good.. real good. But even back then murder was frowned upon. In time I would have turned on the people of my home, so I left to the city where I could hide among the masses. And no, I didn’t tell them who I was. As far as anyone knew I was just a night school teacher. 

"It all fell apart of course, but that’s a story for another time."


bloodanddye:


Adam smiled and wrapped an arm around his daughter and kissed her temple.
"su ba-zìg ñezi-ir. Take a breath. I can get you some water if you want it."
((I gave you goosebumps, my sorrow.)) 

"Ri— A-na-gim? How do I know that? What… I-I-I— Wow!" she laughed, then immediately looked rather ashamed. Quickly, she covered her mouth with her hands, only then realizing the presence of her talons - which scratched her face as she moved. 
"You were really human" she said softly, although she knew it sounded rather foolish. "That seemed like— It wasn’t like in books or stories or photographs. It was real! And I know— Pab - father. You! I-I-I don’t know— I don’t know what to think. I saw— I saw you die" she whispered, as though she were afraid the walls around her might be listening. "I saw your first kill… And the sun. It was— You were like me. Y-you didn’t know! You didn’t understand… Oh my God" she muttered, bringing her knees up to her chest.
"I feel like I’ve robbed someone’s grave…" she whispered.
{What— How?}

He pulled Emily to him and held her, giving her time to calm down, but needing to say one thing.
"I wanted you to know. You’ve not rob any grave, I wanted you know. I had to figure things out too, and I was alone. It’s okay Emily. It’s been a good long while, but I still remember that time. They let me keep the lion’s pelt, and I was given an Auroch. Think a cow so big it could look me in the eye with out lifting it’s head. But yeah. I was scared too.
"It’s okay Emmie. It’s okay."

bloodanddye:

Adam smiled and wrapped an arm around his daughter and kissed her temple.

"su ba-zìg ñezi-ir. Take a breath. I can get you some water if you want it."

((I gave you goosebumps, my sorrow.)) 

"Ri— A-na-gim? How do I know that? What… I-I-I— Wow!" she laughed, then immediately looked rather ashamed. Quickly, she covered her mouth with her hands, only then realizing the presence of her talons - which scratched her face as she moved. 

"You were really human" she said softly, although she knew it sounded rather foolish. "That seemed like— It wasn’t like in books or stories or photographs. It was real! And I know— Pab - father. You! I-I-I don’t know— I don’t know what to think. I saw— I saw you die" she whispered, as though she were afraid the walls around her might be listening. "I saw your first kill… And the sun. It was— You were like me. Y-you didn’t know! You didn’t understand… Oh my God" she muttered, bringing her knees up to her chest.

"I feel like I’ve robbed someone’s grave…" she whispered.

{What— How?}

He pulled Emily to him and held her, giving her time to calm down, but needing to say one thing.

"I wanted you to know. You’ve not rob any grave, I wanted you know. I had to figure things out too, and I was alone. It’s okay Emily. It’s been a good long while, but I still remember that time. They let me keep the lion’s pelt, and I was given an Auroch. Think a cow so big it could look me in the eye with out lifting it’s head. But yeah. I was scared too.

"It’s okay Emmie. It’s okay."


askhenrysturges:

Henry smiled warmly, playing with Adam’s hair lovingly as he closed his eyes.

Adam couldn’t help but hum as the sun faded from the sky.


askhenrysturges:

Henry smiled warmly as he bit back a comment on how he knew what the other was saying, instead giving a nod. “I suppose that makes it *mucg* easier. Organizing the organizations?”

Adam smirked and kissed Henry’s cheek. “It’s silly, I know.”


bloodanddye:

Emily sat as still as a stone, her brown eyes wide with both disbelief and panic. They darted back and forth between his face and the room around them, although she could not explain what exactly she was looking for (even to herself). In fact, she could not think beyond everything that she had seen, even to ask any questions. It had been an experience unlike any other she had before, and to say that she was dumbstruck would have been a heinous understatement. Her body seemed to react from memories of fear and panic, her chest and shoulders heaving rapidly despite there being no physiological necessity for such movement. Her fingers gripped his hand tightly, her talons, extended in her panic, very nearly cutting into his skin.
Her face quickly cycled through almost every emotion that could be named, before settling on an odd mixture of awe, fear and incredulity. Her lips parted as she desperately tried to sort through all that she had seen, as well as the thoughts it stirred in her mind, just enough to answer him. Instead, a nervous, breath of a laugh tumbled out of her.
That was his life… That was his home and his family and his— Death…
"A-na-a…?"

Adam smiled and wrapped an arm around his daughter and kissed her temple.
"su ba-zìg ñezi-ir. Take a breath. I can get you some water if you want it."
((I gave you goosebumps, my sorrow.)) 

bloodanddye:

Emily sat as still as a stone, her brown eyes wide with both disbelief and panic. They darted back and forth between his face and the room around them, although she could not explain what exactly she was looking for (even to herself). In fact, she could not think beyond everything that she had seen, even to ask any questions. It had been an experience unlike any other she had before, and to say that she was dumbstruck would have been a heinous understatement. Her body seemed to react from memories of fear and panic, her chest and shoulders heaving rapidly despite there being no physiological necessity for such movement. Her fingers gripped his hand tightly, her talons, extended in her panic, very nearly cutting into his skin.

Her face quickly cycled through almost every emotion that could be named, before settling on an odd mixture of awe, fear and incredulity. Her lips parted as she desperately tried to sort through all that she had seen, as well as the thoughts it stirred in her mind, just enough to answer him. Instead, a nervous, breath of a laugh tumbled out of her.

That was his life… That was his home and his family and his— Death

"A-na-a…?"

Adam smiled and wrapped an arm around his daughter and kissed her temple.

"su ba-zìg ñezi-ir. Take a breath. I can get you some water if you want it."

((I gave you goosebumps, my sorrow.)) 


bloodanddye:

"I didn’t mean just being a teenager" she said with small laugh. "But I am young and, well… Still fairly clueless. It makes sense, though. I guess that’s how others have found me in the past.” Emily shrugged slightly and tried her best to force the thoughts from her mind.
"I— I’d actually really like to see your home. I mean, where you lived when you alive. When you were human. Could— Would you let me see it? Please?"

Adam nodded and stood, finding a cozy spot on the floor and holding a hand out for Emily to sit beside him. 
After a few moments he settled on a string of memories. “You don’t have to close your eyes if you don’t want to, What ever makes you comfortable.”
There wasn’t nearly as much sand as there is on the site today, though the village was on the edge of the desert, the near by hills, more of very tiny miniature mountains at this point, kept the desert sands at bay and the irrigation canals and fields bordered the open edge of the valley. The village was made of oven fired tan bricks and asphalt mortar, sporting nearly as many inns as there were houses. They were far too far from the city to be policed by the king and the guard house was stationed entirely by locals who had had only the most basic military training. The wall had been added in Adam’s grandfather’s time, only perfunctory at first but it had been expanded once the distant king realized this little sleepy village was almost at a bottleneck of trading routes. Hence the need for so many inns.
Adam’s childhood had been spent helping out were ever he could during the day. Some days he worked in the fields, sometimes I tended the small, 50 head heard of cattle, sometimes he picked up litter int he back alley ways or helped the potters or the smiths or really anyone who was short handed that day. His family wasn’t well off but no one in the little village was and they helped each other as needed. When he was ten his mother wouldn’t let him work, and instead sent him to one of the inns where a traveling scholar from one of the temples had been sent to all the villages to teach people how to read and write.
Almost no one in his village wore the layers of wraps and robes in the picture he had shown Emily, but wool skirts and simple sandals. Only the traders and the scholar wore more. His father was one of the few who had been a guard and when the raiders had come had been called up in an official decree. The king had even send a unit of real soldiers. They had managed to rescue the kidnapped people and bring them back, but his father had died in the effort. The body had been brought back, of course, you couldn’t go to afterlife if you had been left on the field. The air was too dry for there to be much of a stink, but during dusk little Mezizi would not go home. Bodies were always kept in the house for some time. Both to allow the family time to mourn and for the spirit to adjust. Sometimes it was a short as a couple months, some times the body would be kept for years. 
He liked to sit with the traders and listen to their stories, their travels and the other places, the other peoples they had met. Soon he knew the trade routes as well as they did and dreamed of having adventures of his own. Sometimes they told stories of the spirits of the desert, the demons and devils and those he didn’t mind either. His father was taken and buried when his sister had finally comes to terms with the loss. She was the youngest and had taken the longest. His brother was already courting a woman, though he was only a couple years older than Mezizi and her father had agreed to apprentice his brother as a leather worker. On his 14th birthday his mother, Lamail, had given him his father’s sword and his sister had taken to living at the guard’s station to train. 
Mezizi kept right on doing what he had always been doing, whatever needed to be done around the village.  He was quite surprised to find that the girl he liked liked him too. Zimulala-Edin. Soon enough he had saved enough to buy her a dress from one of the traders, though he suspected the old man had given him a deal in return for so many years of listening to the mans stories. When he was 16 they were married. The color of the dress had brought the her green eyes out from under her dark black hair. He began to take jobs more to do with the politics of the village simple because he found he was good at it. It wasn’t like it is today. Before you could offer a rebuttal you had to personally insult the other speaker. If they got angry, or couldn’t come up with a comeback, their entire argument was invalidated. His time spent with the traders, had been well spent. Soon the well had been rebricked and lamps were put in that one dark alley no one wanted to go down, but he had lost the argument for getting a new way he had heard about to pump water into the irrigation canal.
He was 21 when he had boys of his own now, twins, and he had taken it upon himself to teach them how to read as soon as they could walk.That it had taken Zimulala-Edin and Mexzizi so long to have children had been the reason he had lost that argument. As it turn out they had just been saving up for a twofer. His mother had lived to meet them, but had died after their first year. He sang his boys to sleep with the same song he had been sung to sleep with. “u-sa ĝa-nu u-sa ĝa-nu u-sa ĝa-nu ki-áñ u-sa kul-u ki-áñ igi lib-lib-a-ni u ku-ni-ib igi gun-a-ni šu-zu ĝar-bi u eme za ma-li-li-ka-ni mu-ṣa-ba-rum za ma-al-li-li u na-gul-e” (it was the same song he still hummed occasionally today to comfort his modern family) Sleep come, sleep come, sleep come to my beloved, sleep hasten to my beloved! Put to sleep his open eyes, settle your hand upon his sparkling eyes — as for his murmuring tongue, let the murmuring not spoil his sleep.
Here the memory jumped forward. No little intervals, no montages.
Mezizi was in his forties, an old man. There was a roar in the night. Something was killing the cattle. Lions were present in the area of course, but they had long since learned not to attack the herd. The herd was moved to an enclosed pen closer to town and it’s watchtower but damage had already been done. 4 Cattle in four days was a hard loss to the man who owned them. The next morning, a vote was taken to send the cattleman to the city. Still. Lions do not climb to the top of the watchtower and tear the throat out of man on shift when the cows were on the ground floor. It was probably mad. Rabies was well known.
He was joined by two men and three women as they set out to the east, scouting out the path this creature had taken. His father’s old sword at his hip. Another man in the group mumbled something about the cliffs ahead of them and one of the Old Man’s favorite ghost stories. Two of the women teased them for it. “ghosts do not kill cattle or climb towers” Mezizi’s voice was stronger than he felt. He wasn’t a soldier. 
They found them themselves in front of a wooden door set into the rocks. It was old wood, long dried and came apart as he tugged it open. There were no blue tiles or paint, a sign of life in this sea of brown and red. He called into the narrow cave and drew his weapon.  He thought he saw something inside… He stepped into the darkness and found oil in the pedestal lamp which fluttered to life easily and he smiled.
They shouted to him.
He did not remember dying, or waking with the sunset far nearer to town than he had remembered being. But his eyes were open and he was standing as they looked at him. The cattleman and several guards were carrying the dead back to town. The three who had fled instead of fought now cheered. He wasn’t as dead as they had thought he was. One of the guards said it happened occasionally and luckily there were no priests about or they would have to burn him anyway.
Something was very odd. Something was wrong. But he said nothing as they walked back to town. A man who’s survived a mad lion they joked, today would be remembered in his town. What happened? I don’t know. He didn’t want to tell them… Not when he could hear a roar ahead of them.
The lion had backed Zimulala-Edin into a corner, shielding some of the towns children. Of course that idiot hadn’t lit the lamps of the alleyway no one wanted to go down. it leapt, he thought it missed. The lion could smell easier blood and turned to Mezizi, still covered in the blood of his friends, his old blade he realized had been left behind in the cave. The lion itself smelled of blood, Zimulala-Edin’s blood. The sent turned his eyes to black marbles and he grabbed the lion’s lower jaw. It slashed at him, he slashed back and soon he bitten the beast and it was dead. The soldiers were soon at his side and his wife was receiving medical care. But how had he killed the lion. Did he dare tell them he had drunk it’s blood? Turns out he didn’t have too. Zimulala-Edin had been told she could go home to rest and heal and the sun had risen. He burned and blistered almost at the moment the light had touched him. It was Zim who remembered the story of his birth. Born during the Festival of Nana-Suen, the festival dedicated the God of the Moon….
—————
Adam looked to Emily with a smile. “èntar?”
((questions?))

bloodanddye:

"I didn’t mean just being a teenager" she said with small laugh. "But I am young and, well… Still fairly clueless. It makes sense, though. I guess that’s how others have found me in the past.” Emily shrugged slightly and tried her best to force the thoughts from her mind.

"I— I’d actually really like to see your home. I mean, where you lived when you alive. When you were human. Could— Would you let me see it? Please?"

Adam nodded and stood, finding a cozy spot on the floor and holding a hand out for Emily to sit beside him. 

After a few moments he settled on a string of memories. “You don’t have to close your eyes if you don’t want to, What ever makes you comfortable.”

There wasn’t nearly as much sand as there is on the site today, though the village was on the edge of the desert, the near by hills, more of very tiny miniature mountains at this point, kept the desert sands at bay and the irrigation canals and fields bordered the open edge of the valley. The village was made of oven fired tan bricks and asphalt mortar, sporting nearly as many inns as there were houses. They were far too far from the city to be policed by the king and the guard house was stationed entirely by locals who had had only the most basic military training. The wall had been added in Adam’s grandfather’s time, only perfunctory at first but it had been expanded once the distant king realized this little sleepy village was almost at a bottleneck of trading routes. Hence the need for so many inns.

Adam’s childhood had been spent helping out were ever he could during the day. Some days he worked in the fields, sometimes I tended the small, 50 head heard of cattle, sometimes he picked up litter int he back alley ways or helped the potters or the smiths or really anyone who was short handed that day. His family wasn’t well off but no one in the little village was and they helped each other as needed. When he was ten his mother wouldn’t let him work, and instead sent him to one of the inns where a traveling scholar from one of the temples had been sent to all the villages to teach people how to read and write.

Almost no one in his village wore the layers of wraps and robes in the picture he had shown Emily, but wool skirts and simple sandals. Only the traders and the scholar wore more. His father was one of the few who had been a guard and when the raiders had come had been called up in an official decree. The king had even send a unit of real soldiers. They had managed to rescue the kidnapped people and bring them back, but his father had died in the effort. The body had been brought back, of course, you couldn’t go to afterlife if you had been left on the field. The air was too dry for there to be much of a stink, but during dusk little Mezizi would not go home. Bodies were always kept in the house for some time. Both to allow the family time to mourn and for the spirit to adjust. Sometimes it was a short as a couple months, some times the body would be kept for years. 

He liked to sit with the traders and listen to their stories, their travels and the other places, the other peoples they had met. Soon he knew the trade routes as well as they did and dreamed of having adventures of his own. Sometimes they told stories of the spirits of the desert, the demons and devils and those he didn’t mind either. His father was taken and buried when his sister had finally comes to terms with the loss. She was the youngest and had taken the longest. His brother was already courting a woman, though he was only a couple years older than Mezizi and her father had agreed to apprentice his brother as a leather worker. On his 14th birthday his mother, Lamail, had given him his father’s sword and his sister had taken to living at the guard’s station to train. 

Mezizi kept right on doing what he had always been doing, whatever needed to be done around the village.  He was quite surprised to find that the girl he liked liked him too. Zimulala-Edin. Soon enough he had saved enough to buy her a dress from one of the traders, though he suspected the old man had given him a deal in return for so many years of listening to the mans stories. When he was 16 they were married. The color of the dress had brought the her green eyes out from under her dark black hair. He began to take jobs more to do with the politics of the village simple because he found he was good at it. It wasn’t like it is today. Before you could offer a rebuttal you had to personally insult the other speaker. If they got angry, or couldn’t come up with a comeback, their entire argument was invalidated. His time spent with the traders, had been well spent. Soon the well had been rebricked and lamps were put in that one dark alley no one wanted to go down, but he had lost the argument for getting a new way he had heard about to pump water into the irrigation canal.

He was 21 when he had boys of his own now, twins, and he had taken it upon himself to teach them how to read as soon as they could walk.That it had taken Zimulala-Edin and Mexzizi so long to have children had been the reason he had lost that argument. As it turn out they had just been saving up for a twofer. His mother had lived to meet them, but had died after their first year. He sang his boys to sleep with the same song he had been sung to sleep with. “u-sa ĝa-nu u-sa ĝa-nu u-sa ĝa-nu ki-áñ u-sa kul-u ki-áñ igi lib-lib-a-ni u ku-ni-ib igi gun-a-ni šu-zu ĝar-bi u eme za ma-li-li-ka-ni mu-ṣa-ba-rum za ma-al-li-li u na-gul-e” (it was the same song he still hummed occasionally today to comfort his modern family) Sleep come, sleep come, sleep come to my beloved, sleep hasten to my beloved! Put to sleep his open eyes, settle your hand upon his sparkling eyes — as for his murmuring tongue, let the murmuring not spoil his sleep.

Here the memory jumped forward. No little intervals, no montages.

Mezizi was in his forties, an old man. There was a roar in the night. Something was killing the cattle. Lions were present in the area of course, but they had long since learned not to attack the herd. The herd was moved to an enclosed pen closer to town and it’s watchtower but damage had already been done. 4 Cattle in four days was a hard loss to the man who owned them. The next morning, a vote was taken to send the cattleman to the city. Still. Lions do not climb to the top of the watchtower and tear the throat out of man on shift when the cows were on the ground floor. It was probably mad. Rabies was well known.

He was joined by two men and three women as they set out to the east, scouting out the path this creature had taken. His father’s old sword at his hip. Another man in the group mumbled something about the cliffs ahead of them and one of the Old Man’s favorite ghost stories. Two of the women teased them for it. “ghosts do not kill cattle or climb towers” Mezizi’s voice was stronger than he felt. He wasn’t a soldier. 

They found them themselves in front of a wooden door set into the rocks. It was old wood, long dried and came apart as he tugged it open. There were no blue tiles or paint, a sign of life in this sea of brown and red. He called into the narrow cave and drew his weapon.  He thought he saw something inside… He stepped into the darkness and found oil in the pedestal lamp which fluttered to life easily and he smiled.

They shouted to him.

He did not remember dying, or waking with the sunset far nearer to town than he had remembered being. But his eyes were open and he was standing as they looked at him. The cattleman and several guards were carrying the dead back to town. The three who had fled instead of fought now cheered. He wasn’t as dead as they had thought he was. One of the guards said it happened occasionally and luckily there were no priests about or they would have to burn him anyway.

Something was very odd. Something was wrong. But he said nothing as they walked back to town. A man who’s survived a mad lion they joked, today would be remembered in his town. What happened? I don’t know. He didn’t want to tell them… Not when he could hear a roar ahead of them.

The lion had backed Zimulala-Edin into a corner, shielding some of the towns children. Of course that idiot hadn’t lit the lamps of the alleyway no one wanted to go down. it leapt, he thought it missed. The lion could smell easier blood and turned to Mezizi, still covered in the blood of his friends, his old blade he realized had been left behind in the cave. The lion itself smelled of blood, Zimulala-Edin’s blood. The sent turned his eyes to black marbles and he grabbed the lion’s lower jaw. It slashed at him, he slashed back and soon he bitten the beast and it was dead. The soldiers were soon at his side and his wife was receiving medical care. But how had he killed the lion. Did he dare tell them he had drunk it’s blood? Turns out he didn’t have too. Zimulala-Edin had been told she could go home to rest and heal and the sun had risen. He burned and blistered almost at the moment the light had touched him. It was Zim who remembered the story of his birth. Born during the Festival of Nana-Suen, the festival dedicated the God of the Moon….

—————

Adam looked to Emily with a smile. “èntar?”

((questions?))